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Posts from the ‘Nóra Bükki Gálla’ Category

But then again…idealism

Nóra Bükki Gálla

Five dancers, three nations, one artistic principle: diversity. The Spanish-Italian-Hungarian group won a 2 week residency with the 2010 Prix Jardin d’Europe in Istanbul; this January City is part of the DunaPart festival program in Budapest, Hungary.

One has to be bold enough to tackle the issues of social conflicts and interpersonal problems–small and large scale–on a dance stage. It’s a road that may lead nowhere in particular, especially if the artists are hard core romantics; one hardly dares to look for fear of seeing a complete disaster. So we hold our breath and after 50 minutes, relax. Idealism is not dead yet. Read more

Thought Works

Nóra Bükki Gálla

The architect’s eye looks for the mechanism that makes things work, the structure behind the form. In a performance that connects theory and abstraction with the reality of the stage, Filiz Sizanli attempts to show us how the conventional usage of stage space can be challenged, while playing with the interchangeability of dimensions. Drawing a parallel between dynamism and stability, science and art, we find new ways to explore, analyze and describe motion.

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Beyond the Box

Nóra Bükki Gálla

Yesterday could the Istanbulies watch and participate in the 24-hour durational performance Beyond the Box performed and created by Javier Murugarren, Erikk McKenzie, Velvet lee black and Belit Sağ. As the title reveals is Beyond the Box a transdisciplinary attempt in which street theatre, burlesque and cabaret meet improvisation and dance. Dressed in dotted and striped colourful clothes, with a DJ-set from which tones of both salsa and applauds came out, two bags filled with inflatable balls, funny hats and other props does the performance engage its audience in a compelling and generous way. Beyond the Box takes its spectators beyond normative ideas about both art, performance and themselves.

One Too Many

Nóra Bükki Gálla

Being a tourist you are pampered and challenged at the same time: people don’t expect you to keep the rules but on the other hand (since they don’t know your ‘world’, your context) they reflect an image that you might prefer not to see of yourself – and wouldn’t have to anyway, were it not for the simple fact that you are a tourist.

Gabriele Reuter takes that idea: the figure of a foreigner we cannot really identify with, still accept and even grow to love in a way, multiplies it by four and (unfortunately enough for both audience and choreographer) thinks this is enough to make a statement of art. No wonder it isn’t. She tries hard though, dresses her performers in parachutes, jungle costumes and Eskimo wear, adds some truly interesting movement material, and her performers are gregariously confident… Still. Or should we say, all the more…? Read more

Me, Myself and I

Nóra Bükki Gálla

How far can you stretch your boundaries is the question Flemish performer Sarah Vanhee presents to us in her lecture about strangeness. We like to see it as a sociology or political issue but if we dig deeper, we find other aspects to complement the picture. Fragmented as it is, it still adds up to a kind of Dorian Gray portrait – you end up looking at yourself in the mirror with all your past mistakes and possible futures written on your face, block capitals.

Depending on our ethical taste and sensitivity for social nuances we can still live with this image; the bold ones can even try to justify our inability to deal with pressing issues of immigration, frustration based nationalism and a complete and total unwillingness to communicate with the Other. (Oh sure; if we did communicate, we could end up coming to an understanding, Heaven forbid a consensus. But let’s not get lost in the labyrinth of idiotic idealism.) Read more

All or Nothing

Nóra Bükki Gálla

Is there music in the silence between two notes? Can emptiness have a rhythm, a direction, a meaning? John Cage is exploring just that gray area of voices and images blinking out of existence in his piece Lecture on Nothing – a verbal narrative by a single voice, drifting with the flow of free association. Dancer and choreographer Eszter Salamon recreates the same void by using a non-expressive movement material and welding it all in a never ending cycle of repetition.

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Much Better Than Sex

Nóra Bükki Gálla
I always wondered how secret agents in films gritted their teeth but still kept their mouth shut when they were tortured in various inventive ways. They say it’s training, a kind of technique they learn about how to endure suffering, both in a mental and a physical sense. Pieter Ampe and Guilherme Garrido in their provocative and courageous duet of pain management are actually turning it all into a game. A game in which we cannot just stand aside and be polite observers.

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